Unit 1 Student Motivation "Why?"

Why is "motivation" an important topic? Aren't there plenty of other things teachers need to focus on? Aren't we using plenty of motivational strategies already... is this just another one of those?

Unit Outcomes

Participants will

  • discover and explore their own current default style when it comes to motivating students
  • develop a sense of current societal and student attitudes concerning motivation
  • compare learning philosophies of schools they attended, the school in which they teach and the school they would choose for their own children or grandchildren to attend

Student Motivation Survey

  In this exploration, you’ll take our Student Motivation Survey developed by Dr. John Marshall, one of the researchers involved in the Dakota Character grant that helped to support the Teaching From Within film and workshops. This will help you begin to engage with the issues we’ll be exploring throughout the course. You will score and interpret the survey during exploration 3, but for now, allow the survey scenarios to engage your problem-solving process. Become aware of the techniques you tend to turn to when you believe your students need some extra motivation.

 

In this exploration, you’ll take our Student Motivation Survey developed by Dr. John Marshall, one of the researchers involved in the Dakota Character grant that helped to support the Teaching From Within film and workshops. This will help you begin to engage with the issues we’ll be exploring throughout the course. You will score and interpret the survey during exploration 3, but for now, allow the survey scenarios to engage your problem-solving process. Become aware of the techniques you tend to turn to when you believe your students need some extra motivation.


Hollywood and Motivation

  Satire, at its best, draws our attention to a societal problem through exaggeration and humor. But satire only works if it also contains a clear element of truth. In this exploration, you’ll look at two satirical critiques of adult disconnection with the younger generation. In Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, an economics teacher has developed a clear level of comfort with speaking past all of his students. In a classic SNL skit, Chris Farley depicts an insecure adult attempting to motivate rebellious teens. Engage with the brief clips, and reflect on the patterns they uncover and critique.

 

Satire, at its best, draws our attention to a societal problem through exaggeration and humor. But satire only works if it also contains a clear element of truth. In this exploration, you’ll look at two satirical critiques of adult disconnection with the younger generation. In Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, an economics teacher has developed a clear level of comfort with speaking past all of his students. In a classic SNL skit, Chris Farley depicts an insecure adult attempting to motivate rebellious teens. Engage with the brief clips, and reflect on the patterns they uncover and critique.


Asleep in Class

  “When 30 percent of our ninth-graders (ultimately) fail to finish high-school with a diploma, we are dealing with a crisis that has frightening implications for our… future.” —Christopher Swanson, Director of the Editorial Projects in Education Research Center Based on 1500 classroom observations, in 85 percent of the classrooms observed, fewer than half of the students were paying attention. —Mike Schmoker (2006)

 

“When 30 percent of our ninth-graders (ultimately) fail to finish high-school with a diploma, we are dealing with a crisis that has frightening implications for our… future.”
—Christopher Swanson, Director of the Editorial Projects in Education Research Center

Based on 1500 classroom observations, in 85 percent of the classrooms observed, fewer than half of the students were paying attention. —Mike Schmoker (2006)

View:

Asleep In Class” link to YouTube search

Activity / Assignment 3:

Do some research on YouTube. Search "asleep in class" (by clicking above) and find 4 or 5 student-posted videos actually made covertly during class time. What discoveries did you make? Who is to blame for the asleep-in-class phenomenon? Are there educational structures that feed this problem? More importantly, how can we address it, and what might be the long term consequences of students going through school "checked-out" or "disengaged"?

Click HERE to complete your reflections on the Asleep in Class research


What Kind of School?

  Throughout the history of organized education, teachers and systems have employed various approaches for motivating students. This survey describes three major “traditional” approaches to motivation and challenges you to reflect upon the methods used in your school when you were a student, used in the system in which you work now, and the methods that might be used in the kind of school you’d like to be a part of or have your children or grandchildren attend.

 

Throughout the history of organized education, teachers and systems have employed various approaches for motivating students. This survey describes three major “traditional” approaches to motivation and challenges you to reflect upon the methods used in your school when you were a student, used in the system in which you work now, and the methods that might be used in the kind of school you’d like to be a part of or have your children or grandchildren attend.